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Notes: 

After studying an extant piece of taquete at the Cloth Workers Centre. I wanted to redact the draft and weave my own version of this monochrome textile. In order to test my draft, I had to weave the textile. I wove a bag for myself and wanted to weave smaller pieces that could be given away as thank  you gifts or as tokens to people who really inspired me.

Notes: 

Samitum is a commonly found textile in Sasanid Persia. It is found as cloth for clothing, but also as trim on the Antinoe Riding Coats. I decided to weave this set and mount it on detachable cuffs, so I can wear them with any costume. These cuffs were tremendous fun to weave and I look forward to weaving another set. This was my first full samitum project. I wove 2 samples of the central motif before embarking on this set. The first 2 samples were done in larger silk at a wider sett.

Notes: 

I have been wanting to tapestry weave a roundel for years. Weaving a circle is one of the most difficult tapestry weaving techniques and it has taken me a while to build up to attempting a roundel. I have woven this roundel using my SCA heraldry. The main concept of the roundel is based on those Sasanid roundels I have studied at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Notes: 

Historical information This entry was inspired by one of 3  patterned woven textiles were found in Gayet’s Antinoe excavations. These textiles were pillows placed under the heads of Romans in the cemetery (Becker). The 3 pillows found by Albert Gayet in Egyptian cemetery in Antinoe have been dated to the first half of the 3rd Century (Becker,  Hoskins, Pritchard).

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Introduction: the Item This aumônière (alms purse, or pouch) was made as a gift for Mistress Margaret de Mey on the occasion of her elevation to the Order of the Pelican. Margaret often dresses in 14th Century fashion. Therefore this aumônière is based on those in use in the 14th Century. Aumônières were an essential accessory, as clothing of this time did not include pockets. Even noble women of this era are depicted using these items. As this entry is entered as heraldic display, this documentation will forgo further discussion of aumônières themselves.

Notes: 

I am making this to line the Drachenwald Royal Artisan Collar, so it can be pinned to costumes and so as not to chafe if worn next to the skin.This is based on a piece of damask I studied at the Clothworker's Centre London. I have simpliefied the design of this piece.The original is actually woven in samite (compound weft faced twill), but the design motif is quite similar to those used in damask.

Notes: 

This cloth is another family project. this length of cloth was woven and sewn up into a tunic for my son. I used a diamond twill, which was common in the Viking era. Eldgrimr chose the warp color, as this warp was also used to weave cloth for him. I sampled all the weft colors I had in the same wool and let Thor choose what he liked best. He chose this combination.

Notes: 

This project uses a colour and weave effect to produce Hounds Tooth. This shows how easy it is to produce exceptional fabrics on a rigid heddle loom. I wove this bag, after I found a reference to Roman era houndstooth cloth. It is still one of my favorites.This bag was woven for Lady Salonge to remind her of her wonderful times in Insulae Draconis.

Notes: 

This shawl was woven on 4 shafts in point twill threading. It was wet finished and has twisted fringe.I wove this shawl on the same warp as the family Skjoldhamen hoods. I changed the weft to green so that it would coordinate, but not exactly match. I have been using this shawl for years it is warm, functional, and lovely. The wool wet finished beautifully.

Notes: 
11th Century Scandinavian Hood
Handwoven Fabric for 11th C Scandinavian Hoods
By: Jahanarabanu Vivana (EM Jones)
Materials
Wool-
o
JC Rennie Shetland 11/2 S-spun
o
Notes: 

This was woven in 2010 for Baroness Suibhan's first daughter. They have gotten much use of it. :)

This blanket is linen woven in twill, though now I know that nearly all linen finds from the Middle Ages were woven in plain weave.

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