Sasanid

The Senmurv Silk

This silk was dated to the 7th-8th Century . The silk was found in Iran, but the conservationists contend that it may have been made in Central Asia. The cloth itself is a compound weft faced twill (or samitum) the twill as shown in the photograph above is a S twill. A single repeat of the senmurv design was measured at 15.5 inches  by 13.5 inches. Upon study of this textile there appears to be one single treading error in the cloth, which was a great achievement in a cloth with such a large number of threads. The monochromatic design is a light green on dark green.

Textile Image: 

Eagle Samitum

Number 35 was woven on a cotton ground with wool weft. The cloth depicted two eagles facing each other, suggesting the samitum was woven using a point threading for numerous pattern heddles. The pattern is reversible, which shows great skill of the weaver.This piece measured 19" by 18.5".

Duck Samitum

Number 58 is the least preserved Sassanian textile in Weibel. Much of the wefts have worn away. This samitum is woven in silk and depicts a duck in a circle border. Motifs enclosed in roundels are fairly common design elements in textiles of this period, both Sasanian and Byzantine textiles.

Birds Samitum

Number 36 is also woven on cotton ground with wool wefts. Number 36 is not one continuous cloth, but both fragments depicts birds with curved necks. This samitum is reversible. The birds are not exact replicas, which suggests that they are either actually separate textiles, or the motifs were woven in separate parts of the fabric. The birds may be herson and are standing on curled twigs holding palmette branches in theri beaks.The herons are in a large "beaded" roundel.

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